Gentle encouragement

A tale in two parts:

Our informal concerts at Monkton are just that – informal, a safe space for our pupils to venture into the realms of performing to a small audience.

Lunchtime Concert pupils 2In a world which is increasingly obsessed with perfection, it can be difficult for our young people to step up. Recently I asked a pupil whether he would play in a lunchtime concert, and his response was a very firm ‘No, I can’t’. When I enquired a little further, he was absolutely adamant that he is not good enough. I could see that he was clearly troubled, so I quickly withdrew the invitation – ‘don’t worry, nobody’s going to make you play in a concert if you don’t want to’.

I caught up with him again in his saxophone lesson a few days later. He’s a great lad – in the past few months he has ‘discovered’ practice, and that it works! Since then he has made really significant progress, and he has started going along to Concert Band too. A real success story.

I pointed out to to him that it is his teacher’s job to sort out problems – squeaky notes, dodgy rhythm etc. But that the average listener would quite simply respond with ‘Hey, I didn’t know you could play the sax, that was great.’ I reiterated that nobody is going to force him to play in a concert; finding your own voice means deciding for yourself that you want to do something, and I have all too often seen the disastrous results of a child being forced to perform in a concert. Why would you do that to someone? However, I did tell him that it was my hope that at some point he would find the courage within himself, and push himself up onto that stage. Even if it took another two years for him to get to that point…

He came to find me five minutes later to say that he wanted to play in the next concert! What a star – that will have taken him real courage.

Part two:

Last week I was guest adjudicator at a prep school music competition. The first class was a song class and unfortunately one girl (aged 11/12?) forgot her words mid-song. I’m pretty sure that half of the audience of parents were quietly singing along with the solo piano to help her to pick up the words again, me included! Despite welling up, she maintained her composure until the end, but my heart went out to her – such a traumatic experience.

The next class was the woodwind class,  and the same girl played her flute beautifully. Nice recovery. And in the final class of the morning, I’m pretty sure that she was a part of as many as four ensemble items, and ended up winning the class, and deservedly so! I guess her day turned out okay after all!

I was bowled over by this little girl’s resilience. Her final performance was so engaging, and she had clearly heeded my advice in that first class of the morning, despite being so upset. Surely a star of the future, if not in singing then in life!

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